Zombies

As winter approaches, an exclusive Golf Club hires a Multinational biotech whose "revolutionary" fertilizer melts the snow and genetically modifies the grass so its affluent members can play golf all year round. The result is the contamination of the water which ultimately transforms most of the residents into Zombies. One of the few survivors, teenage boy André, watches as the infection rapidly spreads, leaving him alone with his baby sister Annie. Along with Dan, the community security guard and self-proclaimed survivalist, they embark on an adventure that takes them to the source of the contamination. In a race against the clock, they band together to find the cure before everyone they love turns into grass.

A group of film students take three unemployed actors to a disused motel in the Norwegian mountains to make zombie films.

Who needs capers in the middle of a zombie apocalypse? A waiter and his Mallorcan neighbor will answer this and other existential or perhaps not so existential questions.

REMEMBER | Offline

Just when Michael arrives in Berlin to visit his ex-girlfriend Gabi, a terrible virus starts spreading across the city at a rapid pace, turning people into mindless homicidal maniacs. Much to Michael's concern, Gabi's not home; instead, he meets Harper, a teenage plumber's apprentice at work in her apartment block. Together, they manage to barricade themselves when raging hordes of infected people swarm the building. Surrounded by these thirsty zombies, Michael and Harper have their hands full to survive - and it will take all of their ingenuity to make their way out to try and find Gabi.

DOCUMENTARIES | Offline

In 1965, three years before the release of George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead, in Tucumán, director Ofelio Linares Montt shot Zombies in the Sugar Cane Field, a horror film with strong politi- cal allegories. The film opened in the us to great success, but when it was time for its Argentine release, in the midst of Onganía's regime, things went south and all trace of the film was lost. Following Lu- ciano Saracino, a writer in search for the film's original screenplay, Schembri's documentary researches the steps of this cursed classic, with a few surviving images and testimonies of critics, filmmakers and the beloved Isabel Sarli. At the end, an idea is summoned: aren't there too many "coincidences" between Linares Montt's and George A. Romero's films?